Thursday, June 29, 2006

Poetry Thursday

Poetry Thursday's prompt this week: "... using a phrase you hear or say over and over as a starting point for writing a poem."

Courage

“Well, we’ll see.”
Not easily understood, words struggle
Through a strange filter
That distorts , muffles, confounds meaning.

Regain use of your own hands?
“Well, we’ll see.”
Walk again?
Well, we’ll see.”

Can you feel the breeze at the sea shore?
Walking across the sand, trying to
Articulate with a mouth full of pebbles?
No vacation, eh, Demosthenes?

Can I help?
“No!”
Using precious energy to
Gain emphasis, to project the
Mumbled sounds over the waves.

“I have to learn to do it
By myself.”

Water spills from the cup,
The body shudders.

You’re doing better.
“Well, we’ll see.”

10 comments:

  1. This is such an interesting poem, and I adore it, even though it starts with a phrase I detest! My husband is ALWAYS saying, We'll see, when I ask him things. And my mother's favorite word, the word she started every goshdarn sentence with, was Well.

    I love what you did with this everyday phrase, and how you coupled the everyday with Greek history. This stanza is gorgeous:

    Can you feel the breeze at the sea shore?
    Walking across the sand, trying to
    Articulate with a mouth full of pebbles?
    No vacation, eh, Demosthenes?


    I can just see him walking around up here on Ruby Beach, a mouthful of black and gray stones of varying sizes.

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  2. Wow, I'm probably going to use one of those everyday poetic phrases: profound! I like this poem!

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  3. Such a tender poem. Great use of the repetition--it anchors the poem and adds that little touch of hope tinged with sadness at the end. Beautiful.

    Can't wait to explore your site.

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  4. I had a friend who lose so much, including most speech, due to a stroke. She was killed last year by a drunk driver, after dealing with her disability, for years. i have her picture in my room and hear her voice say..."I know Iknow I know." Repition of this simple phrase, communicated most every she said. When she was excited she would say oh boy oh boy oh boy!! Your poem brought her here with me today

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  5. What a lovely poem. So much said with so few words.

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  6. Jen, that's lovely and heartbreaking.

    Was it inspired by the friend you were telling me about a week or two ago?

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  7. how many ways this phrase can be used...and the last two lines invited a bit of tears. it is amazing what this simple phrase can invite.

    i want to know more...

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  8. No vacation, eh, Demosthenes?

    Wow! And as Lynn noted, to have this zinger amid all the everyday is bright, bright, bright.

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  9. The fourth stanza to me, makes the common phrase distinct with much meaning than I give it would typically give credit. Poetry that makes one pause...

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Good to hear from you!